• mt

    With a recent trip to Adelaide for the TDU and first time use of a bike bag for air travel using the BIKND Helium bag, listening to these tips re-assured me that I do indeed have some common sense. The choice over a totally rigid vs rigid based/soft sided bag was also influenced by space/portability when travelling plus bike protection.

  • Philbert

    Sorry, but the video is not an adequate demo. We need to see a step-by-step demo. Here in Japan we frequently pack bikes in bags for the train, and there are three versions: no wheels off (uncommon), front wheel off (most practical), two wheels off (most common). Packing for air travel revolves around protecting the chain rings, the front drop outs and the deraileur hanger and oversize charges. Having done it several times now, I have opted for s&s couplers so I can fit the bike into a hard-sided suitcase that doesn’t, in theory, incur oversize charges. But getting you bike in a box that barely will accommodate 700c wheels is a whole new discussion,

  • Kristian

    Hi guys! Could someone give us a heads-up on the waterbottle protection subject? I cant quiet figure out how this is meant but sure is sounds interesting. Since i’m not a native speaker it is sometime a bit hard to understand… thanks!

    • scottmanning

      My guess is they are put in roughly centrally, but laying down. How I am not sure, tape maybe? I think, if I am right, the idea is that when the bag is on its side, (bottles upright) the load of anything placed ontop is taken by the water bottles, not the bike.

      • Kristian

        Aga, thats what it meant, so the bottles are spaced between the “walls” in order to achieve space so the wheel pockets are not landing on the frame…..guess you could stick the bottles in the wheel pockets, but then again they are laying on the spokes….

        • Philbert

          Kristian, your question only reinforces my comment above. A demo that leaves people with more questions is not adequate. As I said, step by step. Remove pedals (picture) – remove bars (picture) – etc. And despite what the airlines say, it is not necessary to let the air out of the tires.

          • Douglas

            I appreciate seeing how the pros pack bikes in numbers. For an individual ther are a great many step by step videos and pages on the web relating to bike packing.

  • Douglas

    I have flown with my bike perhaps a dozen times, and carried it packed and unpacked on buses and trains. I have used cartons, soft bags, and in the last few years, an EVOC soft bag which seems to provide good protection, but is a bit too large for my road bike. The damage done to the cartons and bags shows how important the parking process is. My bike has never been damaged while packed. Anything which is rigidly attached is prone to damage. I always remove the rear derailleur, and loosely cable tie it between the chain stays. Similarly the bar and shifters is loosely attached to the frame, and positioned so the shifters are not projecting. Reassembly is easy provided the cables are slack (i.e. shifted to highest gear at the rear and small ring at the front). No adjustment should be needed. I agree there is no need to deflate tyres, and the chain should be around the large ring when in the bag. This helps stop the teeth damaging the bag. The EVOC provides support under the chain stays and an extra component to protect road forks. A good idea, I think.