Greipel takes back-to-back victories at the Tour of Turkey

Andrei Greipel (Lotto-Belisol) has continued his great start to 2013 taking out consecutive stages at the Tour of Turkey (stages 4 and 5) and making it six UCI victories for the year so far.

On stage 4 several breakaways distanced themselves from the peloton throughout the course of the day but in the downhill run to the finish the last of the escapees was brought back into the fold. Greipel won the sprint on what was an emotional day for the German, his grandmother having passed away in the hours before the race.

Greipel won in convincing fashion on stage 5 as well, finishing the sprint several bike lengths clear of second-place finisher Matteo Trentin (Omega Pharma-Quick Step).The peloton was split early in the day by a category 1 climb but Greipel managed to hold on with the leaders over that and other climbs throughout the day.

Filippo Pozzato (Lampre-Merida) made a late solo attack but was reeled back in on a stage that saw several groups get away before being pulled back in by the sprinters’ teams.

Greipel’s second win in the 2013 Tour of Turkey gives him nine stage victories in four visits to the Tour.

With five stages of the eight-stage race completed, Natnael Berhane (Team Europcar) holds on to the overall lead he claimed on the summit finish to stage 3. Kevin Seeldraeyers (Astana) and Mustafa Sayar (Torku Sekerspor) round out the podium, 10 and 12 seconds behind Greipel respectively.

Tonight’s sixth stage takes the riders 177km from Bodrum to Selçuk and finishes with a category 1 climb which should prove decisive in the battle for the leader’s turquoise jersey.

Click here to see the full results from stage 5 of the 2013 Tour of Turkey. Click here to see the results from stage 4.

Froome holds on to overall lead at Tour du Romandie

After winning the uphill prologue individual time trial, Chris Froome (Sky) has finished strongly in the first two road stages to hold on to his overall lead in the Tour de Romandie.

Stage 1 was one by Gianni Meersman (Omega Pharma-QuickStep) in a chaotic final sprint ahead of Giacomo Nizzolo (RadioShack-Leopard) and Roberto Ferrari (Lampre-Merida). Meersman had been sharing team leadership duties with Mark Cavendish but when the Manxman was dropped on the main climb of the day, the Col du Mollendruz, Meersman assumed control before going on to time his sprint to perfection.

Ramunas Navardauskas (Garmin-Sharp) took out last night’s second stage, upstaging Enrico Gasparotto (Astana) and stage-one-winner Meersman in the final sprint for the line. The final climb of the day, the third-category Plagne forced a significant selection but with a descent and flat run-in remaining in the stage, things were brought back together and the first 83 riders all finished with the same time.

Overall leader Chris Froome was in that front group, holding on to his race lead, six seconds ahead of AndrewTalansky (Garmin-Sharp) and 16 seconds ahead of Robert Kiserlovski (RadioShack-Leopard).

Stage 3 of the five-stage tour starts and finishes in Payerne tonight and features four categorised climbs over a total distance of 181km.

Click here to see the results from stage 2 of the 2013 Tour de Romandie. Click here to see the results from stage 1.

Adam Phelan finishes second at GP Liberazione

by Jono Lovelock

On the 25th of April in Australia we celebrate ANZAC day. In Italy they celebrate Liberation Day and part of that celebration is one of the most prestigious U23 road races on the Italian calendar, the GP Liberazione.

Raced around the famous boulevards of Roma the race has brought success to previous Australian U23 national teams with both CJ Sutton and Matt Goss gracing the top step. Vuelta KOM winner Simon Clarke also also has a third-place finish to his name. In more recent years both Michael Matthews and Michael Hepburn have finished as runner up.

Well done to Australian Adam Phelan (who rides for Drapac in the NRS) who finished second overnight in the 2013 edition of the race!


Click here to read more.

Mersey Valley Tour kicks off women’s National Road Series today

The women’s 2013 Subaru National Road Series starts today with stage 1 of the Mersey Valley Tour in Tasmania. The three-stage tour features a 17km individual time trial and two hilly road stages, one at 80km long and the other at 87km long.

The Mersey Valley Tour is the first of nine events on the women’s Subaru National Road Series calendar, which features events in Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales, South Australia and the ACT.

The next event on the calendar, and the first event of the season to feature a men’s and women’s tour, is the Battle on the Border, held near the Gold Coast between May 2-5.

Click here to learn more about the Mersey Valley Tour and click here to see the startlist. For all the latest on the Mersey Valley Tour check out the hashtags #merseyvalleytour and #nrs13 on Twitter.

Kirsten Wild to miss next World Cup race with broken shoulder

Argos-Shimano sprinter Kirsten Wild has revealed on Twitter that a crash she sustained in the Omloop van Borsele last weekend has left her with a broken shoulder and tendon damage. The Dutch rider will be out of action for several weeks and will miss the next round in the UCI women’s World Cup, the Chongming Island World Cup in China on May 12.

Wild has started 2013 in sparkling form, winning nine races so far: three stages and the overall at the Ladies Tour of Qatar, Gent-Wevelgem, four stages of the Energiewacht Tour and the Ronde van Gelderland.

Click here to read more at Cycling News.

The Giro d’Italia 2013: a preview

The 96th edition of the Giro d’Italia begins on Saturday week and you’ll be reading plenty about the race between now and the Giro’s end in late May. But to get you in the mood, and to give you a sense of what to expect from the race, check out The Inner Ring’s preview. It features information about each of the stages, the jerseys on offer and more.

Click here to read the article at The Inner Ring.

On Lance, doping, the UCI and more

by Jono Lovelock

Pro rider, blogger and journalist Lee Rodgers has taken an axe to Lance, the UCI and the culture of doping in sport in a recent blog post. It’s long, it’s raw, but it’s thankfully devoid of face-saving pleasantries. He calls a spade a spade. What are your thoughts?

Click here to read the piece at crankpunk.com.

Rough Rider promo video

Here’s a promo for what promises to be a fascinating and revealing documentary, to be shot at this year’s 100th edition of the Tour de France. To quote from Wildfire Films, the team behind the movie:

Throughout the twenty-one days of the most grueling road race, we travel with journalist Paul Kimmage in his caravan, giving us an extraordinary insight into the fascinating, beautiful and often shocking world of professional cycling. At its heart this is a story of one man’s unrequited love for his sport.

Right now, there is no sport with a bigger credibility fight on its hands than cycling, and no event where genuine romance coexists so uncomfortably with hideous reality than the Tour de France. Told against the backdrop of the centenary Tour, and through the eyes of one of the most aggravated whistleblowers in sports journalism, we are going on a journey that could prove to be one of the most contentious sports films of our time.

End of the road for Del Moral

By Jono Lovelock

Spanish doctor Luis Gardia del Moral was handed a lifetime ban last year but he was rumoured to be working regardless. Now, del Moral has been hit by the closure of the sports clinic he was running in Valancia.

Many pundits will be happy to see that at least one ‘bad guy’ is getting his just deserts from the whole USADA/WADA/Armstrong saga [ed. nice rhyme].

Click here to read more at VeloNation.

Eye-tracking experiment: 1 in 5 cyclists go unseen by drivers

Insurance company Direct Line has conducted an experiment using eye-tracking technology which, as road.cc reports, seems to confirm the classic apology “Sorry mate, I didn’t see you.”

Motorists who took part in the experiment were given “specialist glasses that pinpoint the exact focus of the eye”, to determine exactly what is in the driver’s field of vision. Direct Line found that 22% of cyclist weren’t seen by the motorists in the study. Here’s a video of the eye-tracking technology in action:

Click here to read more at road.cc.

A stupidly tall bike

And finally, here’s a video of someone riding a frankly ridiculous bike, one that requires the rider to climb several metres of scaffolding (part of the bike) to reach the saddle. I’m not sure how aerodynamic this ride would be, but it is kinda cool, in a ridiculous way.

Click here to see a photo of the bike.


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